Posts Tagged ‘financial crisis’

Banks Prepare for Credit Card Defaults

Posted on October 20, 2017 by Laura Lam

Credit card delinquencies increased for three consecutive months, adding to signs that consumers in the U.S. are having a tough time paying their debt.  According to recent reports, credit card data from JPMorgan, Discover Financial Services and Bank of America show that the number of delinquencies is on the rise. The reason for the uptick in the number of people who can’t pay their credit card bills is due to lenders going after consumers with less-than-stellar credit ratings. Although this practice is intended to fuel growth in a low-interest rate environment, the lower credit quality is coming back to bite…

Credit Card Delinquencies on the Rise

Posted on October 18, 2017 by Laura Lam

Credit card delinquency rose for the third straight month in September, data from JPMorgan Chase & Co. and card issuer Discover Financial Services suggested.  The data add to signs that U.S. consumers are struggling amid rising household debt, after bank results last week pointed to an increase in provisions for future losses. September delinquencies for JPMorgan rose 1.22%, while those at Discover Financial were up 1.64% from August. Those at Bank of America also rose 1.56% — the second rise in three months.  Credit quality at several banks appears to be deteriorating as lenders target consumers with worse credit ratings to…

Banks Rebuilding Positive Image

Posted on October 10, 2017 by Laura Lam

The banking industry’s image with the American public has climbed to its highest point since the 2008 financial meltdown, with 43% now viewing it positively and 30% negatively. But Americans still view banking less positively than they did in the years leading up to the crisis, when it ranked above the average for other industries Gallup measures. The public’s net positive rating of banking — the percentage with a positive view minus the percentage with a negative view of it — slid from +32 in 2007 to -23 in 2009, and bottomed out at -28 in 2010 and 2012. This year’s…

Purchase Lending Hits 10-Year High

Posted on September 12, 2017 by Laura Lam

During the second quarter of 2017, purchase originations jumped significantly even as refinances shrank, according to Black Knight Financial Services’ latest Mortgage Monitor report.  First lien mortgages jumped 20% from the first quarter and 16% from last year to $467 billion in the second quarter. During the second quarter, refis fell 20%, or $37 billion, from the second quarter to 31% of the market share of originations, the lowest level in 16 years.  However, the 57% quarterly surge in purchase originations more than made up for the fall in refis. This is an increase of 6% from last year to $321…

Home Equity Loans on the Rise

Posted on April 11, 2017 by Laura Lam

Mortgage lenders, along with borrowers, are starting to welcome home equity lines of credit back into the market after the loan product began to disappear in the wake of the financial crisis.  Given their growing prominence in the market, a new report from the American Bankers Association’s Consumer Credit Delinquency Bulletin provides a current pulse on the health of the product by looking at delinquencies.  The report looked at both closed-end loans and open-end loans, since home equity loans fall into both categories. Bankrate explains that there are two types of home equity loans: term, or closed-end loans, and lines of credit, open-end loans.  A home equity…

Student Loan Debt: A $1.3 Trillion Crisis

Posted on March 21, 2017 by Laura Lam

According to the New York Federal Reserve, U.S. student loan debt has soared to $1.3 trillion becoming the second highest consumer debt category, more than both credit cards and auto loans.  Washington College President and former Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Chair Sheila Bair said the student loan debt crisis could spark next financial crisis, since it is a “tremendous drag” on the U.S. economy. During the financial crisis of 2008–09, excessive mortgage debt collapsed consumer spending as more families opted to pay off debt. Bair said the same dynamic could be seen if the student debt bubble bursts.  “With…

Are Automakers Creating the Next Financial Crisis?

Posted on March 06, 2017 by Laura Lam

The country’s auto debt hit a record in the fourth quarter of 2016, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, when a rush of year-end car shopping pushed vehicle loans to a dubious peak of $1.16 trillion. The combination of new car smell and new credit woes stretches from Subarus in Maine to Teslas in San Francisco.  It’s an alarming number, big enough to incite talk of a bubble. On average, every licensed driver in the U.S, owes about $6,100 in car payments. But the market for cars is a lot different than that for houses. Vehicles are a more fluid asset…

Subprime Decline: Millions of Consumers Boost Scores

Posted on July 11, 2016 by Laura Lam

The share of U.S. adults with credit scores that are considered “subprime” fell to 20.7% in April, the 6th consecutive year-over-year decline and the lowest level since at least 2005, when FICO started tracking the data. The ranks of subprime borrowers swelled during the financial crisis, peaking at 25.5% in 2010 as mortgage payments, credit-card bills and other debts went unpaid. The improving trend could bring relief to big banks, which tightened credit standards in the wake of the crisis. An increase in more-creditworthy borrowers could allow them to increase lending without lowering standards. Banks are desperate for revenue growth since the same…

What Should You Spend on a Home?

Posted on May 27, 2016 by Laura Lam

Since the 2008 financial crisis (fueled in large part by a real estate bubble), regulations have been put in place to cut down on predatory lending, most notably through the Title XIV of 2010’s Dodd-Frank Act, which is called the Mortgage Reform and Anti-Predatory Lending Act. The act established national underwriting standards for residential loans, but some consumers are still approved for mortgages that are unrealistic for them when it comes to monthly payments. Tasha Bishop, director of business development at Apprisen, estimates that about 35% of mortgages that are approved are unrealistic for consumers. What’s more: Many people “really trust…

Businesses Fall Behind on Their Loans

Posted on May 25, 2016 by Laura Lam

The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve released its delinquency and charge-off data for all commercial banks in the first quarter – and it’s very sobering data.   While delinquencies on the consumer side appear quite positive, delinquencies on the business side are spiking. Consumer loans and credit card loans have been hanging in there so far. Credit card delinquencies rose in the second half of 2015, but in Q1 2016, they ticked down a little. Mortgage delinquencies are low and falling. When home prices are soaring, no one defaults for long; you can sell the home and pay off your mortgage….